Bulova Unveils the Accutron II


AlphaThe original Bulova Accutron, introduced in 1960 with a revolutionary tuning fork-driven movement was the first truly electronic wristwatch, eclipsing Hamilton’s 1957 electromechanical wristwatch and setting the bar for true accuracy several years before the quartz watch made them all obsolete.

Quartz watches, which are more accurate and much less costly to produce, came to dominate the market, resulting in the Accutron brand dropping the tuning fork movement around 1977 and jumping on the quartz bandwagon. All this did was dilute the brand equity of the Accutron name, which wandered on without a true sense of identity for the next few decades. Once the unique movement was dropped, there just wasn’t anything to differentiate a quartz-powered Accutron from the scores of other quartz watches on the market and the Accutron name became little more than just that.

Bulova made a genuine attempt at reintroducing the line in the 1980′s as a high quality, Swiss-made arm of the Bulova family, featuring quartz watches in superbly crafted cases and these enjoyed some success. When mechanical watches became associated again with luxury, Accutron added Swiss automatic and manual winding movements, creating fine watches to be sure, but the irony of having such a movement in a watch whose name first signaled a break from the traditional was not lost on watch collectors at all. Accutron originally stood for “Accuracy through Electronics”, meant as the watch to replace the mechanical movement watch.

In 2010, Bulova introduced the Precisionist line of wristwatches, featuring a new kind of quartz movement that was far more accurate than the traditional kind and which featured, for the first time, a smoothly sweeping second-hand. It harkened back to the appeal of the original Accutron with its unique movement beating so fast that the second-hand appeared to glide like a satellite in orbit, but in the end, it wasn’t called “Accutron”.

Purists like myself felt all along that Bulova should have used this new movement to reintroduce the Accutron line of watches rather than forge ahead with building a new line from the ground up. Instead of the classic good looks of the original Accutron watches, Precisionist buyers were met with a mostly-odd assortment of overwrought case designs, gargantuan in size, limited in choices. In the years since, only a few new Precisionist models have been introduced annually. Apparently Bulova decided to make some changes and while not killing the Precisionist line, Bulova has instead decided to take a new approach and has made some restructuring changes in their upper lineup of watches.

Bulova-Accutron-II-Alpha-Watch-4First of all, the top-of-the-line Bulova, previously known as the Accutron, which is now the Swiss-made arm of Bulova has changed its name to Bulova AccuSwiss. Ok, so it’s not exactly a game changing name that engages the chronometric hormones of watch envy or anything but it does free the Accutron name from the bonds of being only Swiss and allows Bulova to do other things with it….like maybe pop a modified Precisionist movement (which is made by parent company Citizen in Japan) into a vintage-inspired, successful design of the past and call it the Accutron II. That is just what they did and suddenly Accutron is back again.

The new Bulova Accutron II was introduced this past week at BaselWorld, the annual watch and jewelry fair held in Basel, Switzerland. Drawing from the first Accutron introduced in 1960, the case design, known as the “Alpha” (maybe because it was first?) very closely follows the characteristics of the original with its shield-shaped case and lugs. Where it differs though is that this one looks much more like the limited edition Accutron that Bulova built for the watch’s 50th anniversary. You know, the one that had a real tuning fork movement and cost between $4000 and $5000 USD. Way out of most people’s price range for a Bulova, no matter how limited the run.

Bulova-Accutron-II-Alpha-Watch-16Such is not the case with this new Accutron watch. The new model, which as I mentioned is driven by a modified Precisionist movement, is intended to retail for between $399 and $599 and comes in a variety of metal colors and straps. The entry-level model is the stainless steel “Alpha”, which features a “Spaceview” dial that allows the wearer to see the movement. Admittedly, the new movement is not nearly as detailed looking as the original tuning fork movement was but anyone that knows watches will know this for what it is: a Spaceview, reborn for the 21st. century.

The watch features a recessed and hidden crown for setting the watch, which is also in keeping with the original, although the crown is on the side of the new one instead of the back like the original.  That’s quite alright, as the original was known to have problems with water leaking in the area where the setting crown connected with the back of the watch case. The new Alpha also appears to have a generous amount of luminous material on the hands and dial, hands which look identical to those found on many original Spaceviews. A black leather strap embossed with an alligator pattern completes the package.

Bulova-Accutron-II-Alpha-Watch-5Other configurations include a gold-plated model with a brown leather strap, a rose gold-plated model with a white leather strap and a black PVD cased model with a black mesh bracelet. The black metal model is anticipated to be the priciest version at a few hundred dollars more.

All in all, the new Bulova Accutron II promises many things. It has the vintage appeal of the 1960′s era Accutron coupled with the most modern quartz movement available. While it may not be a tuning fork Accutron, the modified Precisionist movement is the legitimate genetic successor to the original movement and promises a smoothly sweeping second-hand that glides effortlessly. It may not hum with the vibration of the tuning fork but those with good ears will likely be able to listen in a quiet room as the little stepping motor purrs rather than ticks. More than this, the reliability factor will be increased considerably. According to sources, the modifications that were required will make this movement slightly less accurate than a Precisionist but still six times more accurate than a conventional quartz watch. That is still far more accuracy than can be attained with any mechanical watch.

Bulova-Accutron-II-Alpha-Watch-3While there are many original Accutron watches still out there working every day, they are getting harder and harder to fix when damaged, as parts become increasingly scarce and Accutron expert repairers become fewer. Those who still wear them have to take extra care and precaution that the tiny transistorized electrical movement is not damaged from the rigors of day-to-day wear. For those who love their original Accutron watches, the new Accutron II promises to be a much more robust watch that is more suitable for everyday wear. Plus, they are just plain cool.

Look for them in stores later this year.

Tudor Heritage Ranger Announced at Baselworld


photo.PNG copyIntroduced at Baselworld 2014 is a totally new Tudor, yet not quite so new to longtime fans of the brand. Tudor’s original Ranger, their version of the Rolex Explorer, featured the aesthetic values and look of the Explorer without the heftier price tag and the new Heritage Ranger appears to follow in that lead.

Crafted in stainless steel  with a completely brushed finish, 41mm case, the Heritage Ranger is first and foremost a tool watch and definitely looks the part. It is larger by 2mm than the current version of the Explorer and features a matte black dial nearly identical to that of the original. The Ranger features the ETA 2824 movement, heavily decorated and meticulously regulated by Tudor in their Geneva factories.

The hands are in a white gold finish and the pear-shaped hour hand is an homage to the original Ranger, which also featured a similar hand. A sapphire crystal, domed to resemble the vintage models, protects the dial which is also domed while a screw-down crown, emblazoned with the vintage Tudor rose logo, protects the movement to a depth of 150 meters.

photo 2The Heritage Ranger is available on a variety of leather straps, as well as a stainless steel Oyster-style bracelet with vintage-inspired straight end pieces. All versions feature an additional nylon strap in a camouflage colored material.

Prices have not yet been announced but if the pricing strategy follows that of Rolex, the Tudor Heritage Ranger should come in near the entry point of the Tudor brand of watches. Tudor’s focus of bringing back the vintage models reflecting the history of both its own company and that of its older sister Rolex seems to have hit a positive note with watch aficionados everywhere, especially with Tudor now retailing in the United States once again.

The new watch is a great way to break into the Tudor line of watches. It features a robust, time-tested design made modern for today’s market as well as the vintage aspects that have made these watches, quite literally, stand the test of time.

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Tudor Heritage Black Bay Sings the Blues


photo 5When Tudor, the younger and slightly rebellious sister brand of Swiss powerhouse watch brand Rolex introduced the Heritage Black Bay in 2012, it wasn’t long before they realized they had hit a home run.

The Black Bay, an homage to both Rolex and Tudor Submariners of the past, was part of a lineup that had fans of the brand lining up at dealers and prospective buyers in the United States bemoaning Tudor’s n0t-for-sale-in-the-US status…that is, until 2013 when Tudor returned to these shores.

This year, at Baselworld 2014, Tudor has issued a new Black Bay that will have fans singing the blues soon enough….blue as in bezel that is. The new Black Bay is much like the original with a few subtle differences. First, Tudor has made a new, deep blue bezel available and combined it with a black dial, a strikingly different package from the dark brown dial and burgundy bezel of the original. Like the original, the aluminum flange connecting to the crown is also colored to match the blue bezel.

photo 1-2This latest version of the Black Bay dial is also contrasted from the original by having white gold hands, index surrounds and lettering. The snowflake hour hand, unique to the Tudor line of watches returns as well.

Like the Black Bay in burgundy red, the midnight blue model comes either with a stainless steel oyster-style bracelet or an aged leather strap, in blue with this model. A nylon strap in blue is also included with either choice.

Prices haven’t been announced yet but should be similarly priced to that of the original and should be available in authorized Tudor dealers soon. Stay tuned for more news from Baselworld!

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Affordable Retro: Tissot Heritage Seastar PR 516 GL


PR516GLWith the holidays looming, the potential for Christmas bonuses or just the need to add another watch to the stable, one recent find fills a lot of checkboxes on the “What to Buy” list…the Tissot Seastar PR 516 GL. Let’s take a look at that list, in a nutshell. It’s made in Switzerland by none other than the Swatch Group. On the price scale, it falls into the “affordable” range for most watch lovers, well under $1000.00 USD. It offers a lot of value for the money too, both in the features that come standard on it and the quality of construction. It also has history, being a reissue of a model Tissot produced for a number of years. Finally, it has a retro-cool look that harkens back to one of the more interesting periods in our history. This review will cover each of these facets in more detail.

In the current watch stable of the monolithic Swatch Group, Tissot falls in at the top of their middle range according to the hierarchy listed in their annual report. Tissot does produce a few high end models, usually in limited editions to commemorate any number of special anniversaries in their history but overall, the majority of Tissot watches can be had in the $500.00 to $999.00 USD range. The PR 516 GL falls within this price range depending on where you find one and which model you select. When you can find a well-crafted, value-packed Swiss automatic wristwatch from a reputable brand in this price range, you’ve had a good day.

It’s important to keep in mind the name of this particular watch when looking because “PR516″ can also denote other watches made by Tissot that look nothing like the one this article covers. The “GL” makes the difference in the name, and frankly, this watch has a lot of name in the game. The dial alone has six lines of text, including “Tissot” “Visodate” “Automatic” “Seastar” “PR516″ and “GL”, yet it seems to work out well, even if it does give the watch a bit of an identity crisis. To help break this down into bite sized morsels, this basically means:

  • Tissot (Brand)
  • Visodate (Feature, i.e. the Day and Date windows)
  • Automatic (Movement type)
  • Seastar (Line)
  • PR 516 (Model)
  • GL (Submodel)

Fortunately, it lives up to all this dial hype and does so with style and capability. The original, introduced in the late 1960′s is a product of the design ethos of the time. Designers were pushing the boundaries a bit and leaving behind some of the plain, simple but elegant designs of the early 60′s in favor of watches that made more of a visual statement. The word “Cool” was entering the lexicon of daily language and could now be appropriately applied to many of the watch designs coming into the market. The Seastar PR516 GL could be counted among them. The reimagined modern version remains remarkably true to the original. It’s a bit larger, as befits the modern trend toward larger watches but not oversized by any measure. At 40mm wide, it manages to hit the “just right” spot with most watch wearers.

TissotBlackPR516The dial, in my case black and silver, closely mirrors the appearance of the original and is very 1960′s in appearance. It has a silver chapter ring with large, blocky indexes affixed which floats just above the black dial. This part has a faint sun ray pattern that can be seen in bright light, giving the dial more character. The effect is much more apparent in models with the silver or blue dial. The dial also features a vintage Tissot logo, a raised silver block with the letter “T” in the middle. This is a nice touch of class on the watch. The hands, which mirror the indexes in size and shape, are easy to align with the indexes when setting the watch. The hands of the watch contain luminous material that glows brightly after being exposed to light. The indexes also feature luminous material that appears in normal light to be a black line but which actually glows a pale green in the dark. The hands are significantly brighter in the dark than the indexes.

One of the features of this watch is a day and date display, located at the 3 position. These change simultaneously right at midnight with a noticeable click. With the day display, you can choose between a normal day abbreviation or one that has the number of the day of the week in red alongside the day (i.e. 1MON, 2Tue and so forth).

The case is made of 316L grade stainless steel, an industry standard for steel watches. It is polished on the sides and brushed on the top with a large crown that is easy to grasp, yet doesn’t protrude significantly from the case. Pulling the crown to the first position sets the day (counter-clockwise rotation) and the date (clockwise rotation). Pulling the crown to the second position stops the second-hand and allows for setting the time precisely.

Powering the watch is a basic ETA 2824 movement. Aside from the rotor, which carries a modest degree of finishing, the movement is unremarkable and unadorned. On the plus side, it is known for its robust character and dependability, performing its task with typical Swiss precision. It features 25 jewels and can be viewed through the transparent case back. One interesting characteristic is the representation of a steering wheel, which is placed over the movement and underneath the transparent case back, an homage to the racing spirit of the original model.

One of the welcome features on a watch of this price range is the slightly domed and beveled sapphire crystal. The dial is easily viewed through the crystal, which lacks any type of anti-reflective coating. The crystal rises about a millimeter above the case and has a beveled edge all the way around which actually seems to channel light onto the silver chapter ring, making it stand out nicely. I’m very pleased with the crystal, which as I said is a nice touch at this price point.

There are a variety of dials available with this particular model. The one I chose is a basic stainless steel model with a black dial and silver chapter ring. The watch also is available with a blue dial or a silver dial and also in a yellow gold PVD plated case with a white dial. The models with the white/silver dial have the effect of combining with the chapter ring to make the face look larger, although this is an illusion as they are all the same size. The models with the blue dial and silver dial come with an interesting retro bracelet in steel while the black dial model and the gold model have leather straps with deployant claps. Both the bracelets and the straps feature large holes in the racing strap style.

photo copy 16My experience wearing the watch with the leather strap included was very comfortable. The soft, supple leather strap feels good on the arm and does not add weight to the watch. It is easy to size by moving the deployant device. I have not tried on the one with the stainless bracelet but understand from others that, while fashionable, it is not as comfortable to wear as most bracelets. I outfitted mine with a mesh bracelet that is both very comfortable and which actually compliments the retro look and feel of the watch. It is exactly the kind of bracelet that works well on a watch of this period look.

Accuracy, while not in the chronometer range, is acceptable. The watch gains about 20 seconds a day on the arm but this is acceptable for a watch in this range. I generally just stop it now and then and wait for the seconds to catch up.

Overall, the Heritage PR516 GL is a great watch with a vintage look but without the drawbacks of  a vintage watch. The price point nets you a day and date display, a viewable automatic movement with hack feature, a deployant clasp strap and a sapphire crystal, all for about $600.00 depending on where you find them. Multiple sales outlets carry these on the internet and the likelihood of fakes are low in this price range. One should always be cautioned to purchase from a reliable seller.

Tissot has a solid reputation for quality, reliability, style and affordability. These combined traits make for a nice watch that you will be proud to own.

Timeless Designs: The Hamilton Ventura


Ventura1957The year 1957 wasn’t an especially significant one in the decade of the 1950′s but like most all years, it had its claims to fame. In the month of January alone, two events in particular are noteworthy: the inauguration of Dwight D. Eisenhower to his second term of office as President of the United States and the introduction of the world’s first commercially available wristwatch powered by a battery. The Hamilton Electric was born and no other wristwatch in the new Electric line summed up the “Fabulous Fifties” like the Ventura.

Consider the time in which it was born. The 1950′s saw an entire new wave of design come into maturity that mirrored the optimism of the times. Everything, from appliances to furniture, accessories and even homes, reflected the future modern touches of the designers of the time.

Tail fins soared on automobiles, the rocket era was in full swing and with the introduction of the Electric line of wristwatches, Hamilton wanted something that beat with the times. They turned to industrial designer Richard Arbib and from his pen a number of striking designs found themselves rendered into precious metals. The Ventura was the first such design and it has been the most enduring.

The original Ventura, referenced in sales literature of the time as the Ventura I, was introduced on January 4, 1957, along with a more traditional design model, the Van Horn (a safe-bet watch, just in case the new design didn’t go over well with the public) and from the moment it hit the stores, it was a runaway success, despite its somewhat lofty price of $200.00 Crafted entirely of 14k gold (US market versions), the Ventura featured a case design unlike any others of the time with a bold, triangular shape and lugs reminiscent of automotive fins.

Originally fitted with the somewhat troublesome Hamilton 500 electromechanical movement, the Ventura, when properly maintained and cared for, was accurate and never needed winding, although battery replacements were fairly regular, usually about once a year. Within a short time, the more refined and improved Hamilton 505 movement found its way into the Electric of watches.

The first Ventura wristwatches were made available in a yellow gold case with either a black or a silver dial that featured the hours denoted by golden dots with tracer lines that radiated inward. A jagged electric line transected the center of the dial, connecting the 3 and 9 together, the total effect of which suggested electricity with a hint of the atom. A unique two-tone leather strap in black and gold came with the first Venturas but was quickly phased out due to manufacturing costs and a tendency to not hold up well.

The following year, a white gold version was introduced, although it never sold in numbers like the yellow gold versions and consequently is a rarer find today. Additionally, an 18k rose gold version was produced at some point for export only, making it probably the rarest of all Hamilton Ventura watches.

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Rod Serling with his yellow gold, silver dial Hamilton Ventura

In a sea of ubiquitous wristwatches, the Ventura and most of its electric brethren stood out and this uniqueness soon found its way onto the wrists of some notable television and movie personalities. While this was unintentional at the time, product placement was something that Hamilton would take advantage of in future decades.

Rod Serling, the producer of “The Twilight Zone” wore a gold Ventura with a silver dial in his opening and closing monologues on many episodes of the show.

The futuristic, space-age design of the Hamilton Ventura was a perfect fit for both Serling and his hit TV series and he wore the watch for many years after its small screen debut but it was undoubtedly the big screen debut of the Ventura that immortalized the watch in the minds of many fans, linking it forever with the biggest name in the music industry, Elvis Presley.

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Elvis Presley on the set of Blue Hawaii, wearing a yellow gold, black dial Ventura

Presley wore a yellow gold Ventura in the movie “Blue Hawaii” and the watch was highly visible in many scenes, including one brief closeup. It is unknown if the watch was a studio supplied watch or not but apparently Presley liked the Ventura because he added a white gold version with a dealer-installed expansion bracelet to his personal collection. The Ventura later became known as the “Elvis Watch” because of the association with Presley.

The Ventura was produced for six years and was sold by Hamilton jewelers until all the supply was used up. Eventually Hamilton discontinued the Electric line after significant inroads had been made by Bulova’s humming Accutron, as well as the advent of the Quartz controlled wristwatch but the Ventura story was far from over.

Fast forward a quarter of a century to 1988. Hamilton, which had been purchased by the forerunners of today’s Swatch Group in Switzerland was looking to get their name back in the minds of watch buyers. In a market flooded by mostly inexpensive quartz watches of boring design and questionable pedigree, Hamilton had to find a way to both penetrate the existing market and to do something that would stand out from the crowd.

Instead of looking at the existing trends, they decided to look inward at their own history and from their archives, they drew inspiration that started a new trend. Pulling designs that had proven popular in the past, they came out with a new line of old watches, authentic reproductions of timeless classics, reissued to resonate with a modern world.

VenturaAdFrom the 20′s came the Piping Rock and from the 30′s, the Boulton, Ardmore and Wilshire were reborn, among others. Topping the range of models, Hamilton reintroduced the Ventura to a new generation of watch fans who had never seen it before and were immediately taken with the design. The vintage watch trend was born and has continued more or less unabated to this day.

Hamilton made four versions of the “new” Ventura available for purchase by mail order in magazines and later, in retail stores: yellow gold-plated with silver or black dial, white gold-plated with black dial and rose gold-plated with black dial. These new versions of the Ventura were authentically detailed based on the original designs and a very close approximation of the original Ventura. Each came with a color coordinated Teju lizard skin strap, depending on the dial color.

Powered by a modern Swiss quartz movement, the new Ventura was the perfect blend of modern, reliable timekeeping technology encased in a proven, classic vintage design. The wearer of a Ventura was virtually guaranteed that his watch would draw attention when worn and over the next nine years, the new Ventura became a staple in the growing portfolio of the Hamilton Watch Company, now a part of the Swatch Group. Although the appearance changed little, the yellow and rose gold-plated models were eventually phased out as the white gold-plated version with black dial became the standard-bearer.

In 1997, the release of the feature film “Men in Black” reintroduced the Hamilton Ventura to the movie going public as part of Hamilton’s campaign to get their watches on the big screen. The movie became a big hit and the Ventura became a bigger star as the watch of choice worn by Tommy Lee Jones and Will Smith, the stars of the movie.

A chronograph version of the Ventura was released for the sequel, as well as new versions of the classic model, now in stainless steel with dial choices in black, silver and salmon color. While constructed of better grade materials, the post-MIB Ventura models differed from the original Electric models in details as well as movements. Dials were now flat instead of gently domed and the word “Electric” had never appeared on a modern Ventura. The back of the watch was thoroughly modern in design and the tang buckle was replaced by a modern deployant buckle.

In 2007, Hamilton celebrated a milestone with the 50th birthday of the Ventura and released two special editions of the watch. The 50th Anniversary Ventura came in two versions: a larger sized version with an automatic movement and a skeletonized dial for viewing the movement and a traditional version with a quartz movement.

Ventura50The quartz movement version drew the most attention, featuring a case that much more closely approximated that of the original 1957 Ventura, both front and back. Stamped from new dies, this 50th anniversary edition included a sapphire crystal and a domed dial with a unique pattern not seen on a Ventura before. While still evocative of the times in which the Ventura was born, the new dial was different and for the first time in fifty years, the word “Electric” reappeared on the dial. This version is the only quartz powered Ventura to ever feature that word on the dial. A slightly wider 18mm crocodile strap with a vintage tang buckle rounded out the package, as well a commemorative box.

Only 1,957 examples of the 50th Anniversary Hamilton Ventura were crafted for the US market, making this version of the watch one of the rarest of the Ventura line. The automatic also came in a strictly limited and numbered run of 1,957 examples.

Two other versions of the 50th Anniversary Ventura also were produced by Hamilton but these were made for the Asian market and were never sold in the United States. Two runs of 1,957 watches were crafted, one in yellow gold PVD plate and the other in rose gold PVD plate, both featuring dark bronze dials with the original atomic dial indexes of the Ventura I. These were the first new Hamilton Ventura watches in several years to feature a gold tone case and some of these found their way to the US via online retailers like Ebay. Both are considered to be very rare in the western hemisphere.

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2010 Stainless Steel Elvis Presley Ventura

Not one to let a good thing end, Hamilton decided in 2010 to issue two new special editions of the Ventura to commemorate the 75th birthday of Elvis Presley and these are considered by many to be the most authentic reproduction of the original Ventura to date.

The first one was crafted in stainless steel with a steel expansion bracelet similar to the style of bracelet Elvis wore on his personal white gold Ventura purchased in the 1960′s. The black dial retained the signature jagged line across the center and the atomic themed dial of the original Ventura.

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2010 Gold PVD Elvis Presley Ventura

A yellow gold PVD plated version, also with an expansion bracelet in gold, was available, it too with a black dial and a unique red second-hand similar to the ones found on the rare 18k gold models of the past. Even more unique, both watches could be had with a two-tone leather strap in either black and silver or black and gold, depending on the case material. This was the first time Hamilton had offered such a strap since the original 1957 model debuted. The strap, many collectors believe, show the watch in the true way that its designer, Richard Arbib, intended for the Ventura to look….cool, futuristic, striking and unique and on that front, Arbib and Hamilton succeeded.

Ventura21Today, the Hamilton Ventura is considered to be a truly iconic watch of American design and enduring style. It is available in a variety of versions, sizes and features, from the original design reproductions to the automatic, the chronograph and, since 2010, a modern 21st century reinterpretation that redefines the Ventura in a modern world. No other American watch design is as well known or as long lived as the Ventura and its popularity doesn’t seem to be slowing at all.

If you want to own a watch that is both reasonably priced, iconic in design and steeped in history, look no further than the Hamilton Ventura.

Tudor Heritage Chronograph Blue at Baselworld 2013


tudorheritageblueTudor Watch Company, the slightly more outgoing younger sibling of Rolex, has released a new version of its popular Heritage Chronograph, this time with an emphasis on blue. The new “Blue” is a modern reinterpretation of the famous Tudor “Monaco” style chronograph watch introduced in 1973. Available for a limited number of years, the original model has become a collector’s item among knowledgeable Tudor collectors.

The new model features a stainless steel bracelet as well as a handmade cloth strap in corresponding colors to the dial’s own blue, orange and gray color palette. The movement is an ETA 2892, modified by Rolex and with an additional chronograph module made by Tudor. The new Tudor Heritage Chronograph Blue is currently being shown at Baselworld 2013, the International Watch and Jewelry show held annually in Basel, Switzerland. It should be a tremendous hit in the United States when Tudor arrives here later this year.

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Rolex GMT Master II at Baselworld 2013


Rolex GMT-Master II 40 mm in 904L steel with a 24-hour rotatable blue and black ceramic Cerachrom bezel insert, black dial and Oyster bracelet.

Rolex GMT-Master II 40 mm in 904L steel with a 24-hour rotatable blue and black ceramic Cerachrom bezel insert, black dial and Oyster bracelet. Reference 116719BLNR

Rolex has unveiled a new version of its popular aviator’s watch, the GMT Master II and the breakthrough this year is the return of the bicolor bezel.

The bicolor bezel, missing on the GMT Master II since the introduction of the Cerachrom bezel several years ago, was a favorite and distinct characteristic of this model in its previous form, usually appearing in either black and red or the more popular red and blue “Pepsi” bezel.

For Baselworld 2013, Rolex has apparently solved the problem of how to craft a ceramic bezel in one piece out of two distinct colors. This newest version of the GMT Master II, Reference 116710BLNR, features the bezel in black and blue, to denote the differences in day and night and features a blue GMT hand which is more distinctive against the black dial than the green hand which has been a feature of GMT’s the past few years. With the return of the bicolor bezel, the GMT Master II once again becomes a watch that, while sharing many of the attributes of the highly popular Submariner, is distinctly different at the same time.

From Rolex’s own website, the following information about the bezel was unveiled for Baselworld 2013:

EXCLUSIVE TWO-COLOUR CERACHROM BEZEL

A technological and aesthetic feat, the new CERACHROM bezel insert is obtained by a unique process developed and patented by Rolex which allows this ceramic component with two distinct colours to be produced as a single piece. It echoes the traditional two-colour bezel of the original GMT-MASTER and GMT-MASTER II models. The CERACHROM insert, introduced in 2005, has the advantage of being virtually scratchproof, highly corrosion resistant, and its colour is unaffected by ultraviolet rays. Its diamond-polished surface presents an exceptional lustre. The engraved 24-hour graduations are coated with a thin layer of platinum via a PVD (Physical Vapour Deposition) process.

Rolex GMT-Master II 40 mm in 904L steel with a 24-hour rotatable blue and black ceramic Cerachrom bezel insert, black dial and Oyster bracelet in brush and polished combination finish.

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